US Navy Destroyer Escorts of World War II

US Navy Destroyer Escorts of World War II

New Vanguard 289
  • Author: Mark Lardas
  • Illustrator: Adam Tooby, Irene Cano Rodríguez
  • Short code: NVG 289
  • Publication Date: 26 Nov 2020
  • ISBN: 9781472839749
  • Format: Paperback
  • Number of Pages: 48
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This title is not yet published. The date it is expected to be available from is 26 Nov 2020. It is only available for preorder.

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About this Product

The Destroyer Escort was the smallest ocean-­going escort built for the United States Navy - a downsized destroyer with less speed, fewer guns, and fewer torpedoes than its big brother, the fleet destroyer. Destroyer escorts first went into production because the Royal Navy needed an escort warship which was larger than a corvette, but which could be built faster than a destroyer. Lacking the shipyards to build these types of ships in Britain, they ordered them in the US. Once the US unexpectedly entered World War II, its navy suddenly also needed more escort warships, even warships less capable than destroyers, and the destroyer escort was reluctantly picked to fill the gap.

Despite the Navy's initial reservations, these ships did yeoman service during World War II, fighting in both the Atlantic and Pacific, taking on both U-boat and Japanese submarines and serving as the early warning pickets against kamikazes later in the war. They also participated in such dramatic actions as the Battle of Samar (where a group of destroyers and destroyer escorts fought Japanese battleships and cruisers to protect the escort carriers they were shielding) and the capture of the U-505 (the only major naval vessel captured at sea by the US Navy). The destroyer escorts soldiered on after World War II in both the United States Navy and a large number of navies throughout the world, with several serving into the twenty-first century. This book tells the full story of these plucky ships, from their design and development to their service around the world, complete with stunning illustrations and contemporary photographs.

Biographical Note

Mark Lardas holds a degree in Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering but spent his early career at the Johnson Space Center doing Space Shuttle structural analysis and space navigation. An amateur historian and a long-time ship modeller, he is currently working in League City, Texas. He has written extensively about modelling as well as naval, maritime, and military history.
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