US Navy Cold War Guided Missile Cruisers

US Navy Cold War Guided Missile Cruisers

New Vanguard 278
  • Author: Mark Stille
  • Illustrator: Adam Tooby
  • Short code: NVG 278
  • Publication Date: 20 Feb 2020
  • Number of Pages: 48
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About this Product

Faced with an increasingly formidable anti-ship cruise missile threat from the Soviet Union in the early days of the Cold War, and with the recent memory of the kamikaze threat from World War II, the USN placed a great priority on developing air defence cruise missiles and getting them to sea to protect the fleet. The first of these missiles were sizable, necessitating large ships to carry them and their sensors, which resulted in the conversion of a mix of heavy and light cruisers. These ships, tasked with protecting carrier groups and acting as flagships, entered service from 1955 and served until 1980.
The cruisers served in the front lines of the Cold War and many saw combat service, engaging in surface actions from Vietnam to the Persian Gulf. Complementing the conventionally-powered missile cruisers was a much smaller number of expensive nuclear-powered cruisers, including the Long Beach, the USN's largest-ever missile cruiser. Until replaced by the Ticonderoga and Burke classes of Aegis ships, the USN's 38 missile cruisers were the most capable and important surface combatants in the fleet and served all over the globe during the Cold War. Using specially commissioned artwork and meticulous research, this illustrated title explores the story of these cruisers in unparalleled detail, revealing the history behind their development and employment.

Biographical Note

Mark E. Stille (Commander, United States Navy, retired) spent his naval career as an intelligence officer serving on the Joint Staff, the faculty of the Naval War College, and in the ship's company of two aircraft carriers. He is the author of over 40 Osprey titles, focusing on the naval history of the Pacific War. He recently retired from government service after a total of 39 years in the intelligence community and now lives in Annapolis, Maryland.

Contents

Introduction
Missile Cruiser Design and Weaponry
Conventional Cruiser Classes
Nuclear Cruiser Classes
Analysis and Conclusion
Bibliography
Index
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