The Battleship Scharnhorst

The Battleship Scharnhorst

Anatomy of The Ship,General Military
  • Author: Stefan Draminski
  • Short code: GNM
  • Publication Date: 21 Jan 2021
  • ISBN: 9781472840233
  • Format: Hardback
  • Number of Pages: 336
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This title is not yet published. The date it is expected to be available from is 19 Jan 2021. It is only available for preorder.

$60.00

About this Product

The Kriegsmarine‘s Scharnhorst was a German capital ship, described either as a battleship or battlecruiser, and the lead ship of her class, which included one other ship, Gneisenau. She was launched on 3 October 1936 and completed in January 1939, armed with nine 28cm C/34 guns in three triple turrets. She operated with Gneisenau for much of the early portion of World War II, including sorties into the Atlantic to raid British merchant shipping. They took part in Operation Weserübung (April-June 1940), the German invasion of Norway, during which they sank the aircraft carrier HMS Glorious and her escort destroyers Acasta and Ardent. Scharnhorst also sank HMS Rawalpindi in November 1939. In early 1943, Scharnhorst joined the Tirpitz in Norway to intercept Allied convoys to the Soviet Union. On a sortie from Norway to attack a convoy, the German force was intercepted by British ships and during the Battle of the North Cape (26 December 1943), HMS Duke of York and her escorts sank Scharnhorst. Most of her crew was lost.

This is the most comprehensive examination of Scharnhorst ever published, drawing on new research and technology to tell the full story of the ship. It includes a complete set of detailed line drawings with fully descriptive keys and full-colour 3D artwork, supported by technical details, photographs, and text on the building of the ship, as well as a record of her service history.

Biographical Note

Stefan Draminski is an illustrator and naval historian. He has developed a technique for creating breathtakingly realistic 3D models of ships which can be taken apart to create almost infinite details.
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