Imperial Japanese Navy Destroyers 1919–45 (2)

Imperial Japanese Navy Destroyers 1919–45 (2)

Asashio to Tachibana Classes

New Vanguard 202
  • Author: Mark Stille
  • Illustrator: Paul Wright
  • Short code: NVG 202
  • Publication Date: 20 Sep 2013
  • Number of Pages: 48
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About this Product

During the Pacific War the most successful component of the Imperial Japanese Fleet was its destroyer force. These ships were larger and, in most cases, better-equipped than their Allied counterparts. Armed with a powerful, long-ranged torpedo, these ships proved formidable opponents. Initially, they were instrumental in an unbroken string of Japanese victories, but it was not until the Guadalcanal campaign that these ships fully demonstrated their power. In a series of daring night actions, they devastated Allied task forces with their deadly torpedoes. This volume details the history, weapons and tactics of the Japanese destroyers built just before and throughout the war, including the famous Kagero and Yugumo classes, the experimental destroyer Shimakaze that boasted a top speed of almost 40 knots and 15 torpedo tubes, and the Matsu class that represented the Japanese equivalent to an Allied destroyer escort. These ships were designed to be built quickly and cheaply, but proved to be very tough in combat.

Biographical Note

Mark E. Stille (Commander, United States Navy, retired) received his BA in History from the University of Maryland and also holds an MA from the Naval War College. He has worked in the intelligence community for 30 years including tours on the faculty of the Naval War College, on the Joint Staff and on US Navy ships. He is currently a senior analyst working in the Washington DC area. He is the author of numerous Osprey titles, focusing on naval history in the Pacific. He is also the author of several wargames. Paul Wright has painted ships of all kinds for most of his career, specializing in steel and steam warships from the late 19th century to the present day. Paul's art has illustrated the works of Patrick O'Brian, Dudley Pope and C.S. Forester amongst others, and hangs in many corporate and private collections all over the world. A Member of the Royal Society of Marine Artists, Paul lives and works in Surrey.

Contents

Introduction
Japanese naval strategy and the role of the destroyer
Japanese destroyer tactics
Japanese destroyer design principles
Japanese destroyer weapons
Japanese destroyer radar
Asashio class
Kagero class
Yugumo class
Akitsuki class
Shimakaze class
Matsu class
Analysis and conclusion
Bibliography
Index

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