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Viewing Topic "Zulu's"
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Posted by: paul will Apart from the essential histories and a very early campaign book, the Osprey coverage of this war is predominantly focused on the famous battles of Isandlwana and Rorke's Drift. I wonder what the interest would be in books on the Siege of Eshowe, Hlobane/Kambula and Ulundi? The last also features the death of Napoléon, Prince Imperial, albeit in a earlier scouting incident.
Posted on: 04/01/2015 15:08:00

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Posted by: Paintybeard
Total Posts: 359
Joined Date: Monday, 4 February 2013
The pretty recent "Combat" title covers Khambula and while it doesn't do Eshowe it does devote a section to Nyezane which was immediately before that siege.



As a completely wild card idea I would like to propose doing a "Raid" book on Intombe drift... from the Zulu perspective.
Posted on: 04/01/2015 15:51:00
Posted by: Railok
Total Posts: 19
Joined Date: Monday, 8 October 2012
Sounds like a great idea, Paintybeard!. The raid title on Pearl Harbor worked so well since it was written completely out of the perspective of the Japanese (and of course, having Mark Stille as its author).
Posted on: 04/01/2015 23:06:00
Posted by: .George Washington
Total Posts: 164
Joined Date: Friday, 21 June 2013
All 3 being covered sounds good to me.
Posted on: 05/01/2015 00:02:00
Posted by: Equaliser
Total Posts: 43
Joined Date: Friday, 24 February 2012
Obviously Rorke's Drift is the most well-known, assisted by the film Zulu, which many avid enthusiasts like myself drew me to the subject matter. However, it has been done over and over again in books, which end up similar, due to the fact that most details are known through primary sources, etc., leaving nothing really to debate on forums. However, Isandhlwana has huge 'blind spots' or 'dark areas' which are ambiguous, leaving many, authors, historians and enthusiasts various options how they played out, meaning books still be written might open a new window. The other battles are pretty much annihilation engagements, either from the British or Zulu sides, but again most facts are known. Personally, Ulundi saddens me as for all the Zulus did get close, they were never going to break the square and it made really uncomfortable reading, in my opinion. Hlobane, however, which has a couple of books written, is a curious event, Wood and Buller tackling an area without enough info, losing numerous men. Questions should always be asked of their decisions, even though VCs were awarded afterwards. Therefore, the fame of Rorke's Drift and the scale and defeat at Isandhlwana, were always going to capture the most attention. The Prince Imperial was covered very well in Ian Knight's book - 'With His Face To The Foe', which in my opinion, needs no other publication on it, as it basically says it all.
Posted on: 07/01/2015 14:58:00
Posted by: Paintybeard
Total Posts: 359
Joined Date: Monday, 4 February 2013
Good to see you on the forum again Equaliser.




Got to admit that I am beginning to agree with the excellent John Labland who has gone on record as saying: "There is too much Zulu War history being written." With very few exceptions it seems to me that over the last few years we have either got very tired re-hashes of well-known facts or authors deliberately making provocative (and unsubstantiated) claims in a desperate attempt to get themselves noticed.




I would not complain if there was a moratorium on the Zulu war for a decade. After all, there is so much more that could be written about the military history of Southern Africa in 19th. Century.
Posted on: 07/01/2015 15:25:00
Posted by: Equaliser
Total Posts: 43
Joined Date: Friday, 24 February 2012
Thanks for the welcome PB.

Yes, I ended up losing interest in the Zulu War 1879, due mainly to the disappointing books I was buying and reading, they seemed to be promising to say something new, but you discovered after reading the whole book, you'd be lucky to find one sentence saying something different, and even then wasn't exactly eye-opening. Money is too tight to keep buying books that say nothing more than has been previously. I've just started taking an interest again recently, after buying a few of Osprey's books again, the colour plates inspiring me to read, or should I say re-read my other Zulu War books.
Posted on: 07/01/2015 15:50:00

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