Forum

You have 0 bookmarked item(s)
Viewing Topic "Roman Field Engineering."
  Topic Description
Posted by: scratchbuilder The Roman Legions built their empire as much with pick and shovel as they did with the sword! Does anybody fancy an Elite on Roman Army Engineers. In fact engineering and bridging is an area that Osprey hasn't touched outside the Fortress series.
Posted on: 14/07/2013 12:52:00

12 Item(s)     Sort:  Newest Oldest

per page
 
  Post
Posted by: Crested Owl
Total Posts: 4
Joined Date: Saturday, 24 August 2013
I have been interested with some extra ordinary feats of military engineering like those of Caeser and think it is very interesting and important subject.
Posted on: 14/07/2013 15:29:00
Posted by: xeneize
Total Posts: 75
Joined Date: Friday, 18 January 2013
Is a very good topic, the double line of fortifications in Alesia are a book for themselves.
Posted on: 14/07/2013 15:59:00
Posted by: 1830
Total Posts: 17
Joined Date: Friday, 24 May 2013
Hello: A good example of Roman field engineering is the temporary bridge that Ceasar's troops built in the Rhine, curiously the location it's near the site of Luddendorf Bridge in Remagen.
Posted on: 15/07/2013 02:53:00
Posted by: scratchbuilder
Total Posts: 51
Joined Date: Saturday, 6 July 2013
Crested Owl. I take the claims in Caesars memoirs with a very large pinch of salt. He had an excellent corps of engineering officers which included Vitruvius, the greatest architect and civil engineer in Roman history. Also a mechanical inventor of close to genius level. When Octavian/ Augustus boasted at a later date "I found Rome a city of brick and made it a city of marble." It was Vitruvius who did all the work! Caesar can be praised for his foresight in surrounding himself with such men, but they built the siege lines of Alesia and the assault bridges over the Rhine; not Caesar
Posted on: 15/07/2013 09:50:00
Posted by: Crested Owl
Total Posts: 4
Joined Date: Saturday, 24 August 2013
Then, Caesar should be grateful to me for having such a gullible reader. After reading Commentarii de Bello Gallico(Translated version) many years ago, I don't remember Vitruvius though I remember the namesakes of the main characters of TV series 'Rome'...
Posted on: 15/07/2013 14:22:00
Posted by: scratchbuilder
Total Posts: 51
Joined Date: Saturday, 6 July 2013
If anyone is interested there is an entry in the Google encyclopaedia on this website concerning Vitruvius. Crested Owl: Vitruvius was a member of the equestrian order, a member of the Roman middle class. He was a functionary, not one of the "Great Men" who ruled the republic. Caesars Commentaries were not written as history to impress us, but as propaganda to justify himself to the ruling elite of his own time. I have the DVD series Rome and very enjoyable it is. History it isn't! In any work of fiction the principle historical characters of the late republic will forever be coloured by the perceptions of William Shakespeare, rather than the narrative of their own times.
Posted on: 15/07/2013 17:14:00
Posted by: Crested Owl
Total Posts: 4
Joined Date: Saturday, 24 August 2013
scratchbuilder: Please don't misunderstand me. I was just asking you weather it is true or not that Caesar made little of Vitruvius in his account of Gallic wars and took all the credit for his own. There is a little episode of two centurions named Vorenus and Pullo in Caesar's account of Gallic Wars and I guess these are the models of main characters of the TV series. I was talking about these almost unknown historical Roman soldiers not the great men of their time. I know the propaganda purposes of Caesar's works. Just telling you that I was just a passive reader and didn't try to find out the truth behind Caesar's text. And thank you for enlighten me with your knowlege. I couldn't agree with you more. Vitruvius and other hidden geniuses should be discovered and placed with proper respect in the history.
Posted on: 15/07/2013 18:04:00
Posted by: scratchbuilder
Total Posts: 51
Joined Date: Saturday, 6 July 2013
Crested Owl. I did not mean to talk down to you and I hope that you did not think that I was doing so. It seems I misunderstood the point you were making and I apologise for doing so. Caesar was an utterly devious and untrustworthy politician and the late republic was a gangster state! Underneath all the fine words, were a pack of conniving warlords trying to terrorise their way to the top. The only prominent politician I can think of who tried to play by the democratic rules was Cicero. He ended up with his head and hands nailed to the rostrum! Not the senate house door as described in the DVD. The senate house had burned down years before and in the anarchy had never been replaced. The senate met in various public buildings. Caesar was assassinated at a senate meeting in the Theatre of Pompeii and died at the feet of `Pompeii's statue. None of these powerful and greedy men gave any credit to anyone if they could grab it for themselves
Posted on: 15/07/2013 20:48:00
Posted by: Crested Owl
Total Posts: 4
Joined Date: Saturday, 24 August 2013
Of course, I didn't. Never mind.
Posted on: 16/07/2013 06:14:00
Posted by: CMB
Total Posts: 10
Joined Date: Monday, 15 March 2010
Hi scratchbuilder, have you checked out the Elites on siege warfare in the ancient and Roman periods?
Posted on: 25/07/2013 06:38:00
Posted by: scratchbuilder
Total Posts: 51
Joined Date: Saturday, 6 July 2013
Thank you GMB. Yes, I have most of the ancient Elite's. Some of them are useful in this respect, but not comprehensive. I believe that specialist books on this subject would be an advantage.
Posted on: 25/07/2013 11:04:00
Posted by: Crested Owl
Total Posts: 4
Joined Date: Saturday, 24 August 2013
I'd rather support Alesia in here.
Posted on: 01/08/2013 20:21:00

12 Item(s)     Sort:  Newest Oldest

per page
 

Who is online

 
User(s) browsing this topic: 1. 0 logged-in customer(s) and 1 guest(s) (based on users active over the past 5 minutes)