United Kingdom
Advanced search
Osprey will be working from home from Tuesday 17th March. We plan to continue all our operations, while reducing risk of infection by having staff work from home. Please note that we are doing our best to manage incoming post and parcels. For the time being please refrain from sending items to our offices and please assume that items that you have sent to us, have not arrived with their intended recipient. Our priority remains the wellbeing of staff, authors, customers, freelancers, suppliers and distributors. We would like to thank all for their support whilst we transition to virtual operations.

Forum

You have 0 bookmarked item(s)
Viewing Topic "German Camouflage Uniforms of WWII."
  Topic Description
Posted by: scratchbuilder I have suggested a two volume set in the Elite series entitled: German Camouflage Uniforms and Helmet Covers of WWII. Part One, Heer and Luftwaffe. Part Two, The Waffen SS. I am fortunate to own the old Borsarello and Europa Militaria books, long since out of print. There appear to be no cheap reference books on this subject at present, only coffee table books at coffee table prices! Osprey has done a comprehensive series on the armed forces of the Third Reich, but camouflage uniforms in the illustrations are cluttered up with field equipment. Showing the actual structure of the clothing, together with a timeline showing which garments were in production and with which patterns over which periods of time would be very valuable. Also most of these patterns were roller printed and therefore repeated themselves. In SS camo' clothing the pattern usually started at the same place on each garment, so the drops and repeats in the pattern are essential for a realistic painted finish. I believe that these books would be a good resource for modellers and wargamers and also popular with Ospreys general readership. If you are interested: PLEASE POST! The more debate the more chance of seeing these in print.
Posted on: 14/07/2013 11:58:00

12 Item(s)     Sort:  Newest Oldest

per page
 
  Post
Posted by: Crested Owl
Total Posts: 4
Joined Date: Saturday, 24 August 2013
I am just a builder and not a modeler. Building 35/1 models and waiting until I learn how to paint it. But since I have interest in models and hope this forum revive and does well, I support this post.
Posted on: 14/07/2013 15:48:00
Posted by: Nick Hunter
Total Posts: 55
Joined Date: Wednesday, 8 May 2013
It's an interesting topic, but two books might be excessive. One of the things to remember is that a great deal of the camouflage clothing used by the germans was effectively run up ad hoc from rolls of material, and thus there is no standard pattern. In some cases, this really was down to the level of a unit having a local taylor run up some simple smocks and trousers from (for instance) rolls of camouflage material seized from the Italians. Something that covered the various patterns, dates each was available from and general useage would probably be enough, without getting into the minutiae of issue of every possible camouflage garment. if you want that level, then i'm afraid the coffee table book route is probably the way to go, and accept that it'll cost accordingly
Posted on: 14/07/2013 15:54:00
Posted by: Nick Hunter
Total Posts: 55
Joined Date: Wednesday, 8 May 2013
by the way, the point about the pattern-repeats is a very good one - it is also one of the best ways to identify modern forgeries, since much of the original material was made on industrial machinery, with much longer pattern repeats than you can achieve on the home workshop stuff the modern copies are often made on
Posted on: 14/07/2013 16:00:00
Posted by: scratchbuilder
Total Posts: 51
Joined Date: Saturday, 6 July 2013
Thank you for your respose Mr Hunter. When I made my remarks about regularity I did specify SS camouflage clothing, which was mass manufactured in concentration camp factories. ( A fact which people who glamorise the Waffen SS should bear in mind.) I think that two books would be justified. The variations in W SS camouflage are very extensive and there are more varieties of clothing than the other two services. The Heer (army) was well behind the SS in this field and until the last year of the war Luftwaffe cammo' clothing was confined to the paratroops. Cottage industry cammo' clothing did exist, particularly in the last year when the German war economy was crumbling. I can't remember the reference, but I remember reading somewhere that the Germans commandeered several thousand sets of unissued Italian cammo' uniforms and issued them to their own troops, sans helmet covers.
Posted on: 14/07/2013 17:42:00
Posted by: Nick Hunter
Total Posts: 55
Joined Date: Wednesday, 8 May 2013
Well, you never know - there does seem to be a near insatiable appettite for almost anything third reich - i'm still somewhat amazed that there's an entire osprey solely on german helmets, for instance
Posted on: 14/07/2013 17:53:00
Posted by: Nick Hunter
Total Posts: 55
Joined Date: Wednesday, 8 May 2013
oh, and by the way (and apologies if this sounds like smug one-upmanship) some of the luftwaffe feild divisions (who are distincr from the paratroopers, and have a separate supply chain) get various patterns of camouflage clothing, too;
Posted on: 14/07/2013 17:55:00
Posted by: GI Gene
Total Posts: 75
Joined Date: Saturday, 7 February 2009
A very interesting idea that would look good in an Osprey format. One volume could cover Heer and Luftwaffe patterns while the other would focus on the Waffen SS. The artist chosen for this potential project must skilled enough to illustrate well the intricate details of some of the camouflage patterns. I can see a plate dedicated to a specific pattern with detailed views of the helmet covers, smocks, etc next to a soldier wearing them. The color plates in the early Warrior title about the Waffen SS soldier is a good format to adopt and expand upon.
Posted on: 14/07/2013 20:01:00
Posted by: scratchbuilder
Total Posts: 51
Joined Date: Saturday, 6 July 2013
Yes the Luftwaffe did issue its field divisions with a three quarter length cammo' coat. I had thought that it was first issued in 1944, but on checking my reference it was 1943. apologies.
Posted on: 14/07/2013 20:02:00
Posted by: MTG
Total Posts: 30
Joined Date: Wednesday, 21 December 2011
As a stop gap scratchbuilder I'd recommend the recent elite title on camouflage tactics that has some very useful colour plates. The elite title on Wehrmacht helmets naturally includes sectios on covers.
Posted on: 14/07/2013 20:18:00
Posted by: scratchbuilder
Total Posts: 51
Joined Date: Saturday, 6 July 2013
Thank you MTG. I have both of those publications. If the books I have suggested come to fruit I will certainly buy them, but I was thinking more of the new generation of modellers/ enthusiasts who cannot get hold of the older books mentioned above and cannot afford coffee table prices.
Posted on: 14/07/2013 22:31:00
Posted by: CMB
Total Posts: 10
Joined Date: Monday, 15 March 2010
Scratchbuilder, A lot of this is already covered. The Waffen-SS Warrior has good colour plates of SS camouflage, and the four volume and five volume MAA on the Waffen-SS and German Army includes extensive coverage of camouflage uniforms.
Posted on: 14/07/2013 22:31:00
Posted by: scratchbuilder
Total Posts: 51
Joined Date: Saturday, 6 July 2013
Thank you CMB. Yes the Warrior title on the W-SS is excellent, but it is not comprehensive in detail and as I said above, most of the illustrations in all of those books are cluttered with field equipment. If you wanted to go into micro detail (which I don't), you could write and illustrate an Osprey book on the complexities of oak leaf patterns and variations alone! I feel that the WWII modellers among us would like a fast, single strand and reliable guide on a complex subject. These books would also be of interest to the non modelling specialist military readership.
Posted on: 15/07/2013 09:15:00

12 Item(s)     Sort:  Newest Oldest

per page
 

Who is online

 
User(s) browsing this topic: 1. 0 logged-in customer(s) and 1 guest(s) (based on users active over the past 5 minutes)