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Posted by: xeneize The two incursions of Julius Caesar in Britain are a very good RAID book. The first was a limited reconnoisance mission, the second was well planed and more sucefull. Are two raids in Germany, but were almost whithout combat, the most intersting point was the bridge over the Rhine, for the time was a probe of roman power.
Posted on: 10/03/2013 11:08:00

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Posted by: andyana
Total Posts: 25
Joined Date: Wednesday, 9 February 2011
I suggested a title on this topic a while back, but it kind of gathered dust...let's see if it can be resurrected... http://www.ospreypublishing.com/forum/ancient_world/2664/
Posted on: 10/03/2013 11:15:00
Posted by: Nick Hunter
Total Posts: 55
Joined Date: Wednesday, 8 May 2013
The trouble is that there simply isn't the data to cover it in any real detail.
Posted on: 10/03/2013 15:36:00
Posted by: andyana
Total Posts: 25
Joined Date: Wednesday, 9 February 2011
Which is why, in my original suggestion, I suggested lot of context; the situation in Pre-Roman iron age Britain, how the invasion of Britain tied into Caesar's plans for the region, and post-Caesar relations between Britain and Rome, leading up to the invasion in AD43. Granted, this might be diverging slightly from a strictly military focus, but I reckon it would make compelling reading and give a bit of depth to the book.
Posted on: 11/03/2013 04:55:00
Posted by: Nick Hunter
Total Posts: 55
Joined Date: Wednesday, 8 May 2013
...which might well be an interesting book, but does it fit into a RAID format?
Posted on: 11/03/2013 09:07:00
Posted by: andyana
Total Posts: 25
Joined Date: Wednesday, 9 February 2011
It's been done before - Flight 181, a great read, covers an action that took round about 5 minutes from start to finish. Lots of interesting facts on the rise of the hijacking as a weapon of terrorism, the founding of GSG9, etc. Other Ancient titles have covered the context of an particular event, such as Nic Field's one on Spartacus. The further back you go in history, the more context is needed to understand the world as it was back then - was the capitulation of British tribes to Caesar viewed as a win or loss, as the Romans then abandoned Britain? How rare was this sort of punitive expedition (a short examination of other Roman forays could be interesting, like into Saudi Arabia or up the Nile). On another note, it's nice to have a sensible, reasoned debate with someone who's serious - makes a nice change from recent forum antics! :)
Posted on: 11/03/2013 11:45:00
Posted by: Nick Hunter
Total Posts: 55
Joined Date: Wednesday, 8 May 2013
Have you read Syart Laycock's "Britannia - the failed state", BTW? If not, I recommend it to you. While it focuses on the end or roman britain rather than the beginning, it is relevant here as Laycock's argument is that post-roman britain fails so fast and so completely because the pre-roman tribes remain significant throughout the roman history of the province. And yes, it's nice to get back to talking sense :-)
Posted on: 11/03/2013 12:19:00
Posted by: andyana
Total Posts: 25
Joined Date: Wednesday, 9 February 2011
I may have read it - I took a module in Roman Britain at Uni, but to be honest it was rather tedious so my attention wandered somewhat! I'll have a snoop at it on Amazon, and see if it's on the Kindle. Sounds interesting; I did enjoy hearing about the end of Roman Britain. My lecturer was very keen on the idea of the Britain freeing themselves from Roman rule, rather than the traditional view of Britain 'looking to its own defences'. Interesting stuff, which it would be nice to revisit!
Posted on: 11/03/2013 13:49:00
Posted by: Nick Hunter
Total Posts: 55
Joined Date: Wednesday, 8 May 2013
It's a relatively new (2009) book, and perhaps the most interesting thing i've seen on roman britain in the last five years. There seems to be a pretty good correlation between pre-roman tribal boundaries, roman administrative boundaries and post-roman deposits of saxon material culture, suggesting that the saxons are brought in as mercenaries by the locals and settled on existing political break-lines
Posted on: 11/03/2013 13:55:00
Posted by: Nick Hunter
Total Posts: 55
Joined Date: Wednesday, 8 May 2013
BTW, don't confuse it with Leslie Alock's "Arthur's britain", covering the same period!
Posted on: 11/03/2013 14:25:00
Posted by: xeneize
Total Posts: 75
Joined Date: Friday, 18 January 2013
Don't was a conquest, not a campaign, was a RAID!!!!
Posted on: 11/03/2013 21:04:00
Posted by: albertomv
Total Posts: 1
Joined Date: Thursday, 2 June 2011
It would be good to see it published in near future. A very interesting proporsal!
Posted on: 13/03/2013 07:26:00
Posted by: albertomv
Total Posts: 1
Joined Date: Thursday, 2 June 2011
It would be great to see an Ancient World raid book, and CaesarĀ“s expeditions deserve one!
Posted on: 14/03/2013 12:31:00

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