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Viewing Topic "Australian Tank Operations in Vietnam"
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Posted by: kuvaszsleepybear If your looking for some Anzac Day reading check out "Canister!Fire! Australian Tank Operations in Vietnam"(Bruce Cameron,Big Sky Publishing,)Book is detailed,lavishly illustrated,and tells a story little known to most people outside of Australia.The armored forces Australia brought to vietnam included Centurion tanks and M113 APC'sWhen Australia committed to involvement in Vietnam,there was reluctance to send tanks but company-sized units(troops) did great service.They supported infantry,protected bases,and patrolled roads.They were in the thick of fighting against VC and NVA forces determined to destroy them,the tankers were so successful at their jobs their vehicles became prioruty targets.This book will greatly please readers of Vietnam subjects and armor enthusiasts..
Posted on: 26/04/2014 00:08:00

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Posted by: Amaral
Total Posts: 200
Joined Date: Friday, 8 March 2013
Armored tactics in Vietnam, this one should be really done - but including everybody.
Posted on: 27/04/2014 04:06:00
Posted by: xeneize
Total Posts: 75
Joined Date: Friday, 18 January 2013
The NVA tank tactics worth a book too, at the end the decisive weapon don't was the AK or the Huey, was the Tank.
Posted on: 27/04/2014 04:41:00
Posted by: Amaral
Total Posts: 200
Joined Date: Friday, 8 March 2013
The Americans fail the appreciate the importance of tanks in the Vietnamese Theater of Operations, which is quite odd as the First Indochina War was mainly a mechanized war - and this made the ARVN a force very competent in armored warfare, sometimes even more than the US Army. The Vietnamese showed the Americans the possibilities of tank employment in the different terrain of their country, upgrading and using the American-supplied tanks they had (the M113 cupola was an ARVN idea) as the tank force was a bright spot in the Sout Vietnamese military. Their efforts caught the eye of General Westmoreland, who had first believed Vietnam was a battlefield unsuited for tanks, and he started asking for more armor from the US; but only with Abrams that the US amor would really play a more active role and the American casualties would diminish because of them. The Australians had a very small armored contingent of Centurion MBTs that reached Phuoc Tuy in 1967 and then was employed in the Tet Offensive of 1968 to mid-1969, together with the M113s. The AFVs are useful both in defensive, offensive and as quick reaction forces (as the Australians leanerd in Long Tan, when the cavalry rescued the infantry desperately holding the line in true Hollywood fashion). The Australians and New Zealanders also employed their armor in Special Operations, as they infiltrated SAS personnel for their patrols; the Soviet did the same in Afghanistan, showing that only the Americans have this problem with employing AFVs in light and SOF roles - as they would learn in Somalia in 1993, to their cost. Unfortunatelly, I know nothing about the Korean experience. Maybe the Asian bird can help us with that. But I believe the most daring and impressive use of armor in the Second Indochina War was made by the NVA, as xeneize mentioned, because the Soviet doctrine for land warfare was always an armored thrust in an ample front, supported by mechanized infantry e high caliber artillery (175mm howitzers against the American 155mm and 105mm ones). This kind of doctrine demans a high degree of boldness, dashing both from the higher and lower echelons of leadership. The American Colonel Harry Summers, when explaining the stunning NVA dash of 1975 said - in true American fashion - that they so good that the NVA commanders were 'almost' as good as the Americans - I know, I am laughing here too. The most impressive feature of this race to the Sout Vietnamese coast is the capacity to keep those armored forces supplied by a pipeline made through the Ho Chi Minh line which, alone, throws to ashes any American claims of destroying the Communist capacity and beign stabbed in the back by the politicians. Even Fidel Castro sent tractors to help in expanding the trail!
Posted on: 28/04/2014 17:37:00
Posted by: xeneize
Total Posts: 75
Joined Date: Friday, 18 January 2013
Amaral. After the very poor perfomance of the NVA tank corp in 1972, Nguyen Huu An and some officers were send to Soviet Tank school in Kiev. In 1975 the ARVN, without US air support was not match for the NVA armoured Blitzkrieg.
Posted on: 28/04/2014 23:50:00
Posted by: Amaral
Total Posts: 200
Joined Date: Friday, 8 March 2013
Really? I wasn't aware of that. The NVA development of its armored doctrine MUST be studied then.
Posted on: 29/04/2014 05:19:00
Posted by: xeneize
Total Posts: 75
Joined Date: Friday, 18 January 2013
Amaral. The best book of the final NVA offensive is "Black April" of George Veith, have a lot of information never published before. One interesting thing was in Lam Son 719 the NVA was capable of use the tanks against the ARVN FSBs in high ground, the SV tanks and AFV never left the route 9 and was destroyed
Posted on: 29/04/2014 05:49:00
Posted by: Amaral
Total Posts: 200
Joined Date: Friday, 8 March 2013
I will certainly add this one to my wishlist. I would love to see a DUEL showing NVA tanks facing ARVN AT infantry in the Eastern Offensive. A man can dream...
Posted on: 30/04/2014 06:44:00

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