Dutch-Belgian Troops of the Napoleonic Wars

Dutch-Belgian Troops of the Napoleonic Wars

Men-at-Arms 98
  • Author: Otto von Pivka
  • Illustrator: Chris Warner
  • Short code: MAA 98
  • Publication Date: 30 Jan 1980
  • ISBN: 9780850453478
  • Format: Paperback
  • Number of Pages: 48
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$15.95

About this Product

In a desperate attempt to stop the trafficking of British goods, Napoleon absorbed Holland, parts of Westfalia, the Duchy of Oldenburg and the Hanseatic towns of Hamburg, Bremen and Lübeck into Metropolitan France in 1810. The armies raised from these areas fought as allies of the French or as part of France itself from 1795 to 1813. This book examines the history, uniforms, orders of battle and colours and standards of the troops from the Batavian Republic and its short-lived status as the Kingdom of Holland. The text is enhanced with numerous illustrations, including maps, charts and detailed colour plates.

Biographical Note

Otto von Pivka (the nom de plume of Digby Smith) wrote his first title for Osprey Publishing in 1972. He is a prolific author, who has contributed many titles to the Men-at-Arms series on the armies and forces of the Napoleonic Wars. A former major in the British Army, he is now retired but continues to write books on this key period. Chris Warner is a well-known military artist who has illustrated several books in the Osprey Men-at-Arms series. He is truly versatile in his painting and has illustrated a variety of subjects from 17th century armies to the Boxer Rebellion.

Contents

Historical Synopsis The Batavian Republic, 1795-1806 Orders of Battle, 1795-1806 Uniforms, Kingdom of Holland, 1806-10 Orders of Battle, 1806-10 Changes of Title, 1795-1814 The Uniforms of 1814-15 The 1815 Campaign Colours and Standards The Plates

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