United States
Advanced search
Osprey will be working from home from Tuesday 17th March. We plan to continue all our operations, while reducing risk of infection by having staff work from home. Please note that we are doing our best to manage incoming post and parcels. For the time being please refrain from sending items to our offices and please assume that items that you have sent to us, have not arrived with their intended recipient. Our priority remains the wellbeing of staff, authors, customers, freelancers, suppliers and distributors. We would like to thank all for their support whilst we transition to virtual operations.

Blog

Welcome to the Osprey Blog!

2 Item(s)

per page

Dunkirk and the Little Ships

In Military History, Featured
In May 1940, German troops advanced through Holland, Belgium and France with astonishing speed, forcing the British Expeditionary Force and the French army to retreat to the north-east coast of France. The evacuation plan – Operation Dynamo – was put into effect with the expectation that only about 45,000 men might be rescued. However, by the hasty assembly of a vast armada of disparate vessels (thought to be in the region of 900, of which about 700 were privately owned), 338,226 Allied troops were brought safely back to England. Without the contribution of those Dunkirk Little Ships, as they have come to be known, thousands of British troops would have died on the shores of France. In today's blog post, Philip Weir, author of the upcoming Shire title 'Dunkirk and the Little Ships' explores the lead up to this event and gives a brief overview of some of the vessels involved.Continue Reading
Bolt Action: Campaign: Battle of France is the latest supplement to the award-winning World War II wargames rules, giving players the opportunity to take command of the bitter fighting or france, from Fall Gelb and the British withdrawal from Dunkirk to the decisive Fall Rot. In this blog, we delve into Osprey Publishing's Men At Arms series to give you some great reference points for painting French, German, British, and Italian troops for this period.Continue Reading

2 Item(s)

per page