It's the start of a new month, which can only mean one thing for the blog: a new book vote post! This October's vote looks at our Duel series, as 10 more machines of war are pitted against each other. Take a read of the options below and their brief descriptions and as always vote for your favourite! 

  DUE - Humber vs SdKfz 222: Armoured cars in North Africa 1941–3

  DUE - M41 Walker Bulldog vs T-54: Laos 1971

  DUE - British Coastal Gun vs German Coastal Gun: English Channel 1940–44                            

  DUE - Hunley vs Housatonic: Civil War submarine operations 1864

  DUE - US Coast Guard Cutter vs German Submarine: Atlantic 1941–43


Humber vs SdKfz 222: Armoured cars in North Africa 1941­–3

Highly mobile but lightly armed and armoured, armoured cars were extensively used by British and German reconnaissance forces during the back-and-forth campaigns in North Africa.

M41 Walker Bulldog vs T-54: Laos 1971

At the height of the Vietnam War the US-built M41 Walker Bulldog light tank, fielded by the Army of the Republic of Vietnam, clashed with the Soviet-supplied T-54, the most powerful tank arming the North Vietnamese Army.

British Coastal Gun vs German Coastal Gun: English Channel 1940–44

The four-year duel between German and British super-heavy artillery across the English Channel saw frequent exchanges of fire between these long-range guns, which also shelled enemy shipping and other shore-based targets.

Hunley vs Housatonic: Civil War submarine operations 1864

In the first recorded sinking of a surface ship by a submarine, the Confederacy’s Hunley attacked and sank the Union’s Housatonic in Charleston harbour on February 17, 1864.

US Coast Guard Cutter vs German Submarine: Atlantic 1941–43

During a crucial period in the Battle of the Atlantic the cutters of the US Coast Guard played an important role in countering the menace to Allied shipping posed by Nazi Germany’s U-boats.

Make your vote by clicking here!

Now it's time to reveal the results of last month's book vote. Last month's selections were possible titles in our Air Campaign series. The winner with a very respectable 33.14% was Austria 1915-18: Italy's air campaign from the Adriatic to Vienna, with second place going to Operation Black Buck 1982: Vulcans over Port Stanley with 21.21% of the vote. Thanks to everyone who cast their vote, and don't forget to have your say in this month's Book Vote. 

ACM: Austria 1915-18: Italy’s air campaign from the Adriatic to Vienna    33.14%
ACM: The Ruhr 1943: The campaign against Germany’s industrial heartland      18.61%
ACM: Operation Strangle 1943-44: Pioneering air interdiction in Italy 9.08%
ACM: Japan 1945: Carrier raids against the Home Islands                                                  17.96%
ACM: Operation Black Buck 1982: Vulcans over Port Stanley 21.21%

Post Comments

PAUL W posted on 5 Oct 2017 12:08:45
I wonder if there is more to come on the battle of the Atlantic. There does seem scope for several more books in the various serries osprey produce.
PAUL W posted on 5 Oct 2017 12:08:43
I wonder if there is more to come on the battle of the Atlantic. There does seem scope for several more books in the various serries osprey produce.
PAUL W posted on 5 Oct 2017 12:08:41
I wonder if there is more to come on the battle of the Atlantic. There does seem scope for several more books in the various serries osprey produce.
Paintybeard posted on 3 Oct 2017 08:51:31
As you say Neil, the USCG did have some "Flowers" in their order of battle. And these ubiquitous vessels were used by the Free French and Polish navies as well. This is exactly my point: To feature these ships in a Duel title would allow the entire Allied ASW effort to be examined instead of just the American contribution. It does worry me that, occasionally, Osprey seem to tamely go along with the Hollywoodisation of history and make it appear that only the Americans did anything.
KenA posted on 3 Oct 2017 06:51:49
Yes indeed Neil. A few Flower Class Corvettes were transferred to the US during WWII and most, if not all, of them ended up with the US Coastguard. A kind of lend-lease in reverse. However, were these vessels really regarded as cutters by the US? No list of cutters that I have seen includes them, so the proposed Osprey title could well exclude them also.
Neil Grant posted on 2 Oct 2017 23:20:16
Painty - is now a good time to point out that the coastguard used Flower class corvettes. too?
Neil Grant posted on 2 Oct 2017 23:20:12
Painty - is now a good time to point out that the coastguard used Flower class corvettes. too?
KenA posted on 2 Oct 2017 23:06:07
Painty, you have a good point. It was Winston Churchill who said "For my part, I consider that it will be found much better by all Parties to leave the past to history, especially as I propose to write that history". It was Winston’s way of saying that he was going to be the winner and the keeper of his own legacy.

It seems that Osprey has taken a leaf out of Winston’s ‘book’ (as well as keeping an eye on its bank balance). After all, what duty does Osprey have to maintain a historical balance in its publications except sufficient to ensure its continued profitability? This may seem a rather harsh assessment but we have seen a lot of examples of American bias recently from Osprey and it is hard to come to any other conclusion.

As for the Flower Class Corvettes, I couldn’t agree with you more Painty. They did sterling service as convoy escorts in the Atlantic during WWII and not just those of the RN but also those of the RCN as well.
GI Gene posted on 2 Oct 2017 18:58:34
A title about opposing coastal guns shooting it out over 20 miles of the Strait of Dover sounds fascinating.
Paintybeard posted on 2 Oct 2017 17:13:46
Is it beyond reasonable balance to ask for the ASW duel to feature the vitally important "Flower" class corvette instead of (once again) skewing a title just to pander to the American market?

Submit a Comment

You must be logged in as a Bronze, Silver or Gold Osprey member to comment on this post.

Click here to log in.