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Battle for the Falklands - Back in Stock!

In Military History

 

Marking the 30 year annivesary of the start of the Falklands War, we have reprinted our popular titles on the subject. Taken together, they give a comprehensive look at the land, sea and air forces that contested those wind-swept isles.

9780850454826
On the night of 1–2 April 1982, the Argentinian Junta led by Gen. Leopoldo Galtieri made its move against the Falkland Islands. On 3 April British Prime Minister Mrs. Margaret Thatcher faced an appalled and furious House of Commons to announce that Argentine armed forces had landed on British sovereign territory; had captured the men of Royal Marine detachment NP8901; had run up the Argentine flag at Government House; and had declared the islands and their population to be Argentine. This absorbing text by William Fowler details the land forces that contested the Falklands War.

 

9780850454925 In the early hours of the chilly late-autumn morning, April 2 1982, substantial forces of Argentine Marines, with heavy naval and air support, had invaded the Falkland islands, quickly and almost bloodlessly overwhelming a token garrison of Royal Marines. The following day Argentine forces also invaded the Falklands dependency of South Georgia, forcing the garrison of just 22 Royal Marines to surrender - though not before they had inflicted disproportionately heavy losses on their attackers. In this companion to Men-at-Arms 133 & 135 Adrian English and Anthony Watts examine the naval forces of both sides who fought in the battle for the Falklands.

9780850454932

During the Falklands conflict, aircraft (both fixed and rotary-wing) were of crucial importance to both sides: in moving reinforcements quickly across the sea and over the islands, in attacking surface vessels, and in providing protection against attacks from both above and below the waves. The role of air power was thus to assist friendly surface forces in theirs. Consequently, the air arms of the two antagonists functioned in what was essentially a supporting role, but nevertheless a vital one.

 

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