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We would like to apologise for the glitch in the book vote. We are working getting this resolved as soon as we can. While we fix this issue, we have put September's book vote here. We are very sorry for the inconvenience. 

This month the book vote looks at the Raid series. From sieges during the Eighty Years' War to battles in the 1970s, this month's vote covers a wide range of events. Read more about the full list of options below and cast your vote in the poll below!! Plus, check out the results of last month's Campaign book vote below. 

 

RAID: Hellburners in Antwerp 1585: Weapons of mass destruction in the Eighty Years’ War

RAID: Mirbat 1972: The SAS’s heroic battle in Oman

RAID: Operation Anthropoid 1942: The assassination of Reinhard Heydrich

RAID: Operation Jericho 1944: Mosquitos lead a jailbreak

RAID: Sydney Harbour 1942: Japanese midget submarines strike Australia


Hellburners in Antwerp 1585: Weapons of mass destruction in the Eighty Years’ War

Fireships were among the most terrifying naval weapons available in the age of fighting sail, and in the desperate Siege of Antwerp the Dutch rebels took the concept one stage further. The Spanish had built a fortified floating bridge to cut Antwerp’s communications and starve the population out. The Dutch ‘hellburners’ were two merchant ships, each with a carefully prepared three-tonne bomb below decks, to be sailed into the bridge as part of a regular fireship attack. While one failed to explode, the other – triggered by a new clockwork mechanism – blew the bridge and the garrison apart, killing around 800 men. However the Dutch could not exploit this success and the Antwerp surrendered a few months later.

 

Mirbat 1972: The SAS’s heroic battle in Oman

During the Dhofar Rebellion, nine members of the SAS, manning a small outpost in the Omani desert, fought an action against hundreds of Adoo guerrillas attempting to overrun the position. Their defence rested on their ability to keep in action their single 25-pounder artillery piece, a weapon 800yds from the main outpost. Sgt Talaiasi Labalaba manned the exposed weapon alone until he was killed, and he was followed by three others, one of whom was also killed. But the handful of men managed to keep the Adoo at bay long enough for reinforcements and air support to arrive and scatter the guerrillas.

 

Operation Anthropoid 1942: The assassination of Reinhard Heydrich

Reinhard Heydrich was one of the most powerful men in Nazi Germany, and one of the most hated in Europe – known as the ‘Bucher of Prague’ for his brutal rule in occupied Czechoslovakia. In 1941 the Czechoslovak forces in exile in London made the decision to assassinate him, to demonstrate that Czechoslovakia was still in the fight. Jozef Gabčík and Jan Kubiš ambushed Heydrich’s open car on the streets of Prague, and despite the attack not going to plan, fatally wounded Heydrich. The price was heavy, however. The two assassins were hunted down and killed, along with other resistance personnel, while hundreds of civilians were murdered and villages razed in reprisal.

 

Operation Jericho 1944: Mosquitos lead a jailbreak

Jericho was one of the most remarkable raids of World War II. After a series of Gestapo round-ups of suspected Resistance members, Amiens prison in northern France contained a number of agents awaiting execution, and others of exceptional value to the upcoming invasion of Normandy. British and American intelligence pressed for a rescue attempt on the fortified prison. The answer was a jailbreak, aided by armed French Resistance personnel on the ground, but one initiated by a high-risk, precision bombing strike by a handful of Mosquitos and Typhoons to blow holes in the prison walls. Hundreds of prisoners poured out, and although many were recaptured the most important got away.

 

Sydney Harbour 1942: Japanese midget submarines strike Australia

During the height of the Japanese offensives, a small unit of IJN submarines embarked on a long-range mission to strike at a major Australian city. Their midget submarines made it past the initial defences and into Sydney Harbour, but several were sunk, and the Allied cruisers in Sydney – HMAS Adelaide and Canberra, and USS Chicago – survived. This book would examine not just the Sydney attacks and why they failed, but the Japanese submarines’ follow-up bombardments and attacks in Australian waters.

 


CAM: Chaeronea 338 BC  36%
CAM: The Berezina 1812  51%
CAM: Tannenberg 1914  10%
CAM: Operation Pedestal 1942  2%
CAM: First Chindit Expedition 1943  1%

 

Did your favourite win? Which Raid title did you vote for? Let us know in the comments!

Post Comments

MTG posted on 2 Sep 2020 18:19:48
Mirbat is my top choice but I’d also like to see a title on Anthropoid as well.
GI Gene posted on 2 Sep 2020 17:25:43
Frankly I am surprised that Operation Pedestal got such a low percentage.

This month I voted for Sydney since Japanese submarine attacks on Australia do not get a lot of attention.

I would like to see a Campaign title about Madagascar 1942 that covers the Japanese mini submarine raid on Diego-Suarez and the British landings on that island afterwards.
Tarawa90 posted on 2 Sep 2020 15:38:10
Ah, back to the good old days when we could rig the book vote. I went with Operation Jericho, I figure Anthropoid will be made anyway.
AdamC posted on 2 Sep 2020 07:51:39
Last months results are complete nonsense! There is no way that's accurate. No title has ever scored 1% (5% is the lowest ever recorded) and certainly not a WWII Campaign title (Philippine Sea at 13% was the lowest). I'd declare that vote completely void if I were you Osprey. It's a real shame as they were a really good selection of Campaigns. I have little faith that this months will be accurate either. I don't know what's happened to the website during lock down but it appears to have gone completely to pot! The book vote has broken down, all the book icons have turned into weird, squashed squares, titles are multiplying unchecked and numerous titles have reverted back to their temporary covers. It looks a mess these days. Osprey's IT department certainly has it's work cut out when you are back in the office.
Ambermeercat posted on 2 Sep 2020 04:33:10
Hi, I'm from Sydney Australia, just wanted to say was a hard choice for me. My grandfather was in 464 Squadron RAAF which was one of the Mosquito squadrons which took part in Operation Jericho 1944. With the later attacks on Gestapo HQs they became known as the Gestapo Hunters. During the night of the midget sub attack on Sydney Harbour my mother who was a year old and my aunt who was a baby would not stop crying all night. My grandmother was deaf and did not learn of the attack till the next morning and all the noise was the reason for them being upset. I voted for Jericho as I wanted to see this as a raid title since the series started.
kuvaszsleepybear posted on 2 Sep 2020 00:43:46
Mirbat Mirbat Mirbat.I've been asking for an Osprey Mirbat since I can't remember,not chuffed about "Hellburners" but would purchase the rest,now where is PEBBLE ISLAND?? LOL.
KenA posted on 1 Sep 2020 23:00:49
I thought last month’s vote was totally weird and didn’t prove much except that the voting system used was suspect. As for this month’s vote I already have at least 3 books about Anthropoid and Heydrich so I don’t want another. Mirbat doesn’t grab me I’m afraid. That leaves my choice as Jericho, which has a bit of mystery surrounding it. Importantly, it involved low level precision bombing by Mosquitos and was successful, later leading to similar precision bombing raids on Gestapo HQs at Aarhus and Copenhagen.
Atkinson posted on 1 Sep 2020 18:01:17
I wouldn't worry about the results. Stinger vs Hind won 3 times over the last 3 years but has never been written.
Paintybeard posted on 1 Sep 2020 17:58:12
Paul W: I really doubt that the results reported for August can be accurate. Osprey have put a disclaimer at the top of this page saying that the site isn't working properly. And, leaving aside my own very biased desire for a book on "Pedestal", a title on Tannenburg has been asked for so often that I cannot believe it would only garner 10% of the votes.
Gavin Brown posted on 1 Sep 2020 16:00:15
Glad to see 'Berezina 1812' won. As for this month's vote, I'm definitely voting for Anthropoid.
PAUL W posted on 1 Sep 2020 15:35:39
Painty, I think you must of been the only person not to vote last month, I did towards the end of the month and it was showing over 18,000.people had voted! Or possibly more accurately over 18,000 votes had been received. Not sure how Donald Trump would interpret these results!
I agree about this months titles, all very good. I'm a bit biased as suggested both op Anthropoid and mirbat.
I notice this month you dont see the current standing just an offer to vote again, which must defeat the purpose of the poll in the first place.
Paintybeard posted on 1 Sep 2020 14:40:28
As it was not possible to actually vote for last months suggested titles I trust that nobody in Ospreys planning department will pay any attention to the results that have been listed here. (Obviously Operation Pedestal would have won by a mile in a real vote!)

All this months titles are worth having. I'm voting for Mirbat 1972, although it is difficult to see how it could be described as a raid.

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