May Book Vote

In Military History, Featured

This month's book vote sees five Combat Aircraft titles battling for your vote. Read the full descriptions and have your say by clicking on the link below. Plus, check out the results of last month's Duel book vote.

Kawanishi H6K ‘Mavis’ and H8K ‘Emily’ Units in Combat

Fw 190 Jabo Units in the West

RF-4 Phantom II Units of the Vietnam War

B-47 Stratojet Units of the Cold War

Me 163 Units in Combat

 

 Kawanishi H6K ‘Mavis’ and H8K ‘Emily’ Units in Combat

Kawanishi’s H6K ‘Mavis’ and H8K ‘Emily’ were the Imperial Japanese Naval Air Force’s principal flying boats during World War 2. Both types served throughout the far-flung Japanese Empire, carrying out offensive missions, patrolling the broad reaches of the Pacific Ocean, escorting convoys and transporting men and materiel between Japan’s many island bases.

 

Fw 190 Jabo Units in the West

Although the Fw 190 was designed as a fighter, like the Bf 109 that it supplanted in the frontline from late 1941, the Focke-Wulf was also modified into an effective low-level Jabo (bomber). With the development of sub-types suited specifically for air-to-ground operations, the Fw 190 could carry a useful munitions load and also be able to look after itself when meeting opposing fighters. Fw 190s were particularly active along the Channel coast from Dover to Plymouth, attacking coastal towns and naval ports in nuisance raids aimed at stretching RAF fighter resources.

 

RF-4 Phantom II Units of the Vietnam War

Aviators in USAF and US Marine Corps RF-4 Phantom II units flew some of the most dangerous missions of the Vietnam War, particularly when they had to follow up air strikes to provide bomb damage assessment in the wake of air strikes against targets in Vietnam. Unarmed, they were required to fly straight and level along predictable routes against defences which were well prepared for their arrival.

 

B-47 Stratojet Units of the Cold War

The Boeing B-47 was Strategic Air Command’s most numerous bomber, with nearly 2000 in service during the 1950s. Its development was fraught with technical and operational challenges, but it eventually became a fully capable medium bomber which supported SAC’s global alert force throughout the most critical years of the Cold War. Although the B-47 fleet never saw combat, its RB-47 derivates flew dangerous reconnaissance missions—including overflights of the Soviet Union—and were involved in numerous aerial incidents, including the loss of three jets to MiGs.

 

Me 163 Units in Combat

The revolutionary and radical Messerschmitt Me 163 interceptor was the only rocket-powered aircraft to be used operationally by the Luftwaffe in World War 2. Its incredible high climbing speed meant that it could reach the altitude of Allied bomber formations quickly, but its volatile fuel arrangement meant that the Me 163 could be incredibly dangerous to fly.

 

 

 

Last month, we asked what you would like to see published in our Duel series. Thank you to everyone who voted and provided feedback. The results saw one book stealing the lead. Check out the full results below to find out more!

 

 

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